Thanks to the Bishops of New Mexico for advocating stricter rules to reduce methane emissions at New Mexico oil and gas wells and how the state’s Environmental Improvement Board can do this. August). Political and regulatory reforms to contain methane are necessary and long overdue. Individual action is independent of government reforms: We are not allowed to throw leftovers in the trash. Leftover food in landfills is a major contributor to methane emissions.

Instead of throwing away leftover food, we compost it. A great option in Santa Fe is Reunity Resources’ doorstep program. You fill a bucket weekly or bi-weekly and Reunity picks it up at your doorstep and replaces it with an empty one. Reunity also accepts leftover food on the farm, with the containers always accessible. All of the leftover food feeds his commercial composting operation, which feeds the soil. Go to reunityresources.com/doorstep.

The extremely oversized article on Guadalupe Street that is now on the news dominates a very public space. I remember thinking when I first saw it that the city must have zoning policies to regulate private displays in public areas. Santa Fe’s restorative justice system can overcome the unfortunate vandalism, but the current conversation should also include protecting the size of our small downtown area.

The balance between trade and our endangered historic roads requires responsibility and respect for all. Many Santa Feans remember the gallery on Old Pecos Trail that nailed artwork to every possible outdoor surface, the giant drop-out banners that popped up a few seasons ago, or the shiny metal figurines that are all over town propagate. We share a very small footprint for such visual overload. Perhaps a local park – similar to the popular Shidoni room – could be considered through the Restorative Justice process. Local commercial work could be enjoyed in an open, walk-in environment.

On August 25, the authors of two short letters to the editor (“A Question of Choice” and “Freedom?”) Suggested that the anti-vaccination protesters likely share the same mentality as the Lobby for Life. The authors did it backwards. Indeed, the calls for “freedom” and “rights” are precisely those of abortion advocates. In both cases, those who declare “my body, my choice” forget that others are involved in the unfortunate decision to be accountable only to themselves and the possible harm and, in the event of an abortion, the certain death of. to neglect Another. Pro-life people protect all human life, while the anti-vaxxers just don’t seem to care

Rachel Gudgel, the embattled education leader forced to resign, should have been commended for defending the education of local students when she allegedly said, “It’s not that making pearl sandals improves student outcomes.” She had a valid point. The context of Gudgel’s comment is a push by local guides to use cultural crafts as a teaching method. For a long time, local children had two to three grades below their white peers. Their proposal, which is already in place at some Native American charter schools, is to teach math using traditional indigenous crafts and, for language proficiency, teach indigenous languages ​​like Tewa.

It may sound good, but I think this new approach would doom native students to a lifetime of math-counting and reading-illiteracy. There is no way to teach math without solving math problems, as there is in every country and culture in the world. Gudgel stood up for Native Kids and she was the anti-racist in this Kerfuffle. Instead of being pushed out, Gudgel should have been promoted to Secretary of State for the New Mexico Department of Public Education.